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Onesafe
  • Editor Rating

  • Rated 4 stars
  • Excellent

  • Onesafe
  • Reviewed by:
  • Published on:
  • Last modified: May 8, 2015

Review Summary:

PROS: Nicely designed. Easy to use. Very functional. Brings some innovative features.

CONS: No browser extensions.

If you were ever interested in using a password manager to store all your credentials and sensitive info, than you’ve probably found out about one of the most popular applications in this category, called 1Password. This is an expensive solution which does bring some amazing features, and which is nicely designed and very helpful. We have reviewed 1Password a few months back, as well some of its main competitors like PassLocker and LastPass as well. Reading all these reviews can be helpful since most password managers are high priced applications, so in order to get the most of them you’ll first need to know what you can expect.

Today we’re reviewing OneSafe, which is the latest addition to a world of password managers in the Mac App Store. At a first glance I could see a very interesting and simple interface, which is one of the most important things about this software category, and it was quite affordable – only $13. Continue reading to see what we think about this application.

OneSafe 3

Once you open OneSafe for the first time you’ll be greeted with a welcome screen where you’ll need to create a master password. This is the same case with any password manager, since you always need to have a password which opens up the vault and reveals all your sensitive data. What’s interesting about OneSafe is that it allows you to create one of five password types: PIN – a typical four digit password; Standard password– a standard alphanumerical type; Pattern – where you’ll need to draw a visual pattern to unlock; Combination lock – rotating wheel with numbers; There’s also very interesting TRI-PIN type where each key contains a number, but also a color, and a symbol. As you can see, this is a pretty good start for OneSafe and I believe that most users are going to be impressed with the initial screen.

OneSafe 2

Once you’ve made your own master password, you’ll be ready to continue to OneSafe’s main screen. On the left side you’ll see a sidebar filled with categories, which is the main navigation tool. These categories could be created by a user as well, so they can bring up customized template using which you can easily enter desired information. For example, there’s a template for web-logins, and there’s a completely different template for your bank account info. These templates are very helpful and they bring amazing level of customization.

OneSafe 1

What I would like to highlight with this application is there are two categories found in the left-positioned sidebar of OneSafe. Those are: Document, and Double Password. The first one allows you to store document files (but this could be also done with pictures, videos, and similar) by dragging and dropping them into OneSafe, where you can choose to keep or remove un-vaulted copy. The second one, named Double Password, can be used to encrypt your data with yet another password so even if someone succeeds in opening up your vault, this data is still going to be protected with a password.

The only thing I didn’t like about OneSafe is that there are no browser extensions, which seriously limits its functionality in everyday computing. This is exactly where applications like 1Password take over potential users.

3 COMMENTS

  1. There’s a war raging between hackers and companies, and you’re caught in the crossfire. Every time a company gets hacked, you have to change your password. And don’t you dare reuse it somewhere else. Dreaming up a different password for every site and service is the only way to keep your stuff safe online, but it’s also a gigantic nuisance.

  2. I agree, however password manager software isn’t 100% full proof either. Our reviews is to give readers to make better decision in choosing how to store their passwords online.

  3. Does anyone know if OneSafe now has browser plugins like 1Password has? I think they said it was coming but I can’t see any information that suggests they have them now.

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