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TuneUp
  • Editor Rating

  • Rated 4.5 stars
  • Outstanding

  • TuneUp
  • Reviewed by:
  • Published on:
  • Last modified: Nov 9, 2013

Review Summary:

PROS: Very easy to use and nicely complements iTunes. Very useful.

CONS: A bit pricey.

If you’re a Mac user, there’s a pretty good chances that you’re using iTunes as your default media player. Even more, if you’re using an iOS device, there’s no better way to sync all your digital contact, than to use Apple’s own iTunes.

Ever since the first version of iTunes became publicly available, which was 11 years ago, every new Mac came preloaded with this application, which comes as a part of iLife suite. Also, you probably won’t find better alternative, since this application is a media hub for audio and videos files, iOS applications, books, and gives you access to online store. Yes, because of all of this, you probably have quite large iTunes’ library file which automatically stores all your digital content. And this is when things can become tricky and sometimes very time-consuming.

Having your iTunes library neatly organized is always a good idea, since it makes this application perform better and it gives you better overall aesthetics. Since it does take some time to organize all those files by yourself, there’s an application which can do this for you, automatically. It is called TuneUp, and is made by TuneUp Media. It can be purchased through Mac App Store for $50, or you can subscribe for $40, annually. Currently it comes with a discount of 20%, so it’s good time to purchase it in case you’re interested.

TuneUp is actually an iTunes extension, which opens up and sticks right next to iTunes’ window. It basically offers four tools named: Clean, Cover Art, DeDuper, and Tuniverse.

Clean is used to fix mislabeled songs from your library. All you need to do is to drag a song onto TuneUp and it will find all the information automatically, like name of a song, artist, release year, genre and more. You can also use analysis tool to check your entire music collection for any wrong information, which could be replaced automatically. I’ve found this tool very helpful, and works really well. Some users experienced mislabeling, but this raises the question if they’ve set the bar for TuneUp too high. I’ve good pretty large song collection, and TuneUp found all the right information.

Next, Cover Art replaces just like you would imagine – your songs’ cover art. Just like the rest of the information, it embeds new cover art into a song, so you can see it when you transfer it onto your mobile phone or mp3 player.

DeDuper is trademarked name for a tool used to check for duplicates. It also gives you options to fine tune your search as well as the given results. This tool works very well, and I’ve had no problems whatsoever.

Finally, Tuniverse is used to show you additional information about the song that’s currently playing, like lyrics and artist’s biography. You can also find concert dates and such information. It’s nice to have this tool, even though I haven’t found it essential.

In overall, this is a perfect tool for optimizing your iTunes library, and could be essential for someone with huge number of songs. It does the job very well, but I think it would reach much more potential users if the price is a bit lower.

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Our team of writers have broad backgrounds and varied interests but there’s one thing we all have in common: we’re completely and utterly enchanted, head-over-heels-crazy-in-love with the Mac and wider Apple product line. It is sharing this passion with you since 1995 that puts a spring in our step each and every day.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Have anyone here used this product before?
    What is your own opinion.
    I am subjected to reviews here, so please justify.

    • I’ve been using TuneUp since early 2010, two gold licenses (that’s around $50 something). It was a GREAT app until the last two updates, when they decided to automate the “correction” process and 99% of the times it’s completely wrong (tries to correct iTunes Store songs, as example), probably because the public database they are using now is faulty, and mostly filled with errors and typos. I’m not using it anymore, and I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone.

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